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Hoist Standards in Europe, guidelines.

Traditionally, European countries have maintained national standards in reference to a large number of industrial products,
e.g. DIN (Germany), BSI (United Kingdom). In addition the FEM (Federation Europeenne de la Manutention) has published standards specifically for material handling and lifting equipment.
With the creation of the European Union, organizations for standardization were established at different levels of regulatory authority covering numerous product areas. The highest regulatory level is a European Standards Commission.
Its regulations are absolute and regulatory, focusing primarily on worker safety and protection from occupational hazards.

There are three main regulations:
• Machinery Regulation (including Lifting and Material Handling Equipment)
• Low Voltage Electricity Regulation
• EMV – Electro-magnetic Compatibility Regulation

At the next level are CEN (mechanical) and CENELEC (electrical) Standards. They are more detailed and product oriented than the regulations. Per definition, the publications of CEN and CENELEC are “Standards”, non-regulatory guidelines, reflecting state of the art design and construction practices. They are based on the highest level of probability that equipment, designed to these standards will be safe and functional. They do not preclude deviations or “product improvement based on technological progress”.

The goal of the CEN & CENELEC Committees is to harmonize the new, European norms with existing country-specific norms. The committees responsible for generating new standards include workgroups and sub-committees, which are comprised of representatives of related industries, academia and engineering research, as well as legal counsel. When a new CEN/CENELEC standard is introduced and “HARMONIZED” (language, legal, etc.) national norms (DIN (Germany), BS (England), AFNOR (France),
AENOR (Spain), etc) lose validity.

CEN/CENELEC and ISO maintain communication between their committees working on related subjects. FEM is an Industry Association of Material Handling Manufacturers,
similar in nature and function to MHIA Product Councils (HMI, CMAA, MMA, etc.). FEM specifications are not regulatory, yet they are widely accepted in the international arena, and usually referred to in the absence of national standards.

Following is a listing of European standards and specifications for hoists and related equipment:

CEN STANDARDS
Selection of primary standards published by the European Committee for Standardization (CEN; website www.cenorm.be) for hoists and related material handling equipment:
EN 341 Cranes – Bridge and Gantry Cranes
EN 13135-1 Cranes – Equipment – Part 1:Electrical Equipment
EN 13135-2 Cranes – Equipment – Part 2:Non-electrical Equipment
EN 13157 Cranes – Safety – Hand Powered Cranes
EN 13155 Cranes – Safety – Non-fixed Load Lifting Attachments
EN 13557 Cranes – Controls and Control Stations
EN 14492-1 Cranes – Power Driven Winches and Hoists – Part 1: Power Driven Winches
EN 14492-2 Cranes – Cranes – Power Driven Winches and Hoists – Part 2: Power Driven Hoists
EN 60204-32 Safety of Machinery; Electrical Equipment of Machines; Requirements for Hoisting Machines.

FEM STANDARDS
The Federation Europeenne de la Manutention (FEM; website www.fem-eur.com) publishes many standards for hoists and related material handling equipment. Some of the primary ones are:
FEM 1.002 Illustrated Terminology of Heavy Lifting Equipment
FEM 9.811 Rope and Chain Hoists – General Specifications
FEM 9.511 Rules for the Design of Series Lifting Equipment - Classification of Mechanisms
FEM 9.661 Rules for the design of Series Lifting Equipment - Dimensions and Design of Rope Reeving Components
FEM 9.683 Selection of Hoist and Travel Motors
FEM 9.852 Power Driven Series Hoist Mechanisms, Standardized Test Procedure for Verification of the
Classification
FEM 9.755 Measures for Achieving Safe Working Periods for Motorized Serial Hoist Units (S.W.P.)
FEM 9.751 Power Driven Series Hoist Mechanisms, Safety
FEM 9.901 Rules for the Design of Series Lifting Equipment and Cranes Equipped with Series Lifting Equipment

DIN STANDARDS
Selection of primary standards published by the Deutsches Institut für Normung (DIN; website www.din.de) for application, design, maintenance and safety aspects of hoist and related equipment. (DIN EN indicates harmonized standard):
DIN EN 14492-2 Cranes – Power Driven Hoists
DIN EN 60204-32 Safety of Machinery; Electrical Equipment of Machines; Requirements for Hoisting Machines.
DIN 3051-Sections 1–4 Lifting Ropes; Steel Wires
DIN 15017 Cranes & Hoists; Principles of Motor and Gear Sizing
DIN 15020- Sections 1–2 Hoists; Principles of Rope Reeving
DIN 15061- Sections 1–2 Cranes & Hoists; Grooves for Rope Sheaves & Drums
DIN 15100 Serial Lifting Equipment; Nomenclature
DIN 15400 through DIN 15414 Detailed Aspects of Load Hooks and Bottom Block Construction

BSI STANDARDS
Selection of primary standards published by British Standards (BSI website www.bsi-global.com) for hoists and related material handling equipment. (BS EN indicates harmonized standard):
BS EN 292 Safety of Machinery
BS EN 14492-2 Cranes – Power Driven Hoists
BS EN 60034-1 Rotating Electrical Machines: Rating and performance
BS EN 60034-5 Types of Enclosures for Rotating Electrical Machines
BS EN 60204-32 Safety of Machinery - Electrical Equipment of Machines - Part 32: Requirements for Hoisting Machines

3 comments:

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